now published in IREE (2019-3)

Estimating microcredit impact with low take-up, contamination and inconsistent data. A replication study of Crépon, Devoto, Duflo, and Pariente (American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2015).

by Florent Bédécarrats, Isabelle Guérin, Solène Morvant-Roux, and François Roubaud

Abstract
We replicate a flagship randomised control trial carried out in rural Morocco that showed substantial and significant impacts of microcredit on the assets, the outputs, the expenses and the profits of self-employment activities. The original results rely primarily on trimming, which is the exclusion of observation with the highest values on some variables. However, the applied trimming procedures are inconsistent between the baseline and the endline. Using identical specifications as the original paper reveals large and significant imbalances at the baseline and, at the endline, impacts on implausible outcomes, like household head gender, language or education. This calls into question
the reliability of the data and the integrity of the experiment protocol. We find a series of coding, measurement and sampling errors. Correcting the identified errors lead to different results. After rectifying identified errors, we still find substantial imbalances at baseline and implausible impacts at the endline. Our re-analysis focused on the lack of internal validity of this experiment, but several of the identified issues also raise concerns about its external validity.

» Read this replication study here.
» See a list of all publications in IREE here.

recently published in IREE (2019-2)

Revisiting the Drivers of Natural Gas Prices. A replication study of Brown & Yücel (The Energy Journal, 2008).

by Gavin Roberts

Abstract
This paper replicates the analysis in the paper “What Drives Natural Gas Prices?” by Stephen P.A. Brown and Mine K. Yücel. The replication confirms the results of that analysis: a long-run relationship existed between natural-gas prices and crude-oil prices during the period from June 1997 to June 2007. This relationship was primarily driven by crude-oil prices, as natural-gas prices adjusted to deviations from the long-run relationship. Controlling for exogenous covariates related to weather, seasonality, and supply disruptions strengthen the price relationship between these two commodities. When the sample is expanded to include data generated as recently as June 2017, evidence of the long-run relationship disappears completely. I posit that this results from increased U.S. natural-supply associated with the “shale revolution”.

» Read this replication study here.
» See a list of all publications in IREE here.

new publication (2019-1)

Tweet Sixteen and Pregnant: Missing Links in the Causal Chain from Reality TV to Fertility. A replication study of Kearney & Levine (American Economic Review, 2015).

by David A. Jaeger, Theodore J. Joyce & Robert Kaestner

Abstract
We replicate and extend the analysis of the positive association between social media (Google searches and tweets) and the MTV program 16 and Pregnant recently published by Melissa Kearney and Phillip Levine (2015). We find that the relationship disappears or even turns negative when we include in the analysis periods when new episodes of 16 and Pregnant were not being broadcast. The results are also sensitive to the use of weights. Our results cast substantial doubt on social media as a link in the causal chain between reality television and fertility.

» Read this replication study here.
» See a list of all publications in IREE here.

Welcome to IREE: the journal for replications in empirical economics.

 

The International Journal for Re-Views in Empirical Economics (IREE) is the first journal for the publication of replication studies based on micro economic data. Furthermore, IREE publishes systematic reviews, micro data sets and descriptions thereof, and articles dealing with replication methods and the development of standards for replications. IREE is an e-journal and articles are published continuously after passing a fast peer-review process. Along with the article, authors must submit the underlying data and programming. The several parts of the publications (article, data, and programming) are each provided with a DOI to be citable in due form and restored in a data archive. IREE is an open access journal and all content is without any charge to the users and authors. We aim to support transparent and open research based on micro-economic data and thereby to improve research quality in empirical economics.