newly published in IREE

The Impacts of Hookworm Eradication in the American South. A replication study of Bleakley (The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2007).

by David Roodman

Abstract
Through designs akin to difference-in-differences, Bleakley (2007) produces evidence that the campaign to eradicate hookworm from the American South circa 1910 boosted school enrollment in childhood and income in adulthood. This comment works to replicate and reanalyze that study. Innovations include incorporation of the larger U.S. Census samples now available, and fitting of specifications focusing more sharply on the timing of any effects of the campaign, which are the basis of the most credible identification. The long-term convergence between historically low- and high-hookworm areas documented in Bleakley (2007) began decades before the campaign and did not accelerate in a way that would invite hookworm eradication as an explanation. Likewise, in the case of adult income, the convergence continued for decades after. In sum, hookworm eradication did not leave a telltale imprint on the historical record assembled here.

» Read this replication study here.
» See a list of all publications in IREE here.

from the editors

Editorial

by Martina Grunow, Hilmar Schneider, Gert G. Wagner, and Joachim Wagner

Abstract
Lack of reproducibility is seriously undermining the credibility of science as a whole. By extrapolating the findings of isolated checks, one may expect a substantial fraction of published articles in scientific journals to contain findings that simply do not hold. But we do not know which articles are affected – they usually remain uncovered.

» Read this editorial here.
» See a list of all publications in IREE here.

recently published in IREE

Inflation and Broadband Revisited: Evidence from an OECD Panel. A replication study of Yi and Choi (Journal of Policy Modeling, 2005)

by Klaus Friesenbichler

Abstract
This note revisits the conjecture that the use of broadband internet lowers transaction costs and thereby inflation. Using a macro-economic panel of OECD countries, it replicates and expands previous estimations by Yi and Choi (2005). We confirm the direction of the results, but also highlight a series of conceptual and econometric issues in the original contribution that need to be addressed.

» Read this replication study here.
» See a list of all publications in IREE here.

 

Welcome to IREE: the journal for replications in empirical economics.

 

The International Journal for Re-Views in Empirical Economics (IREE) is the first journal for the publication of replication studies based on micro economic data. Furthermore, IREE publishes systematic reviews, micro data sets and descriptions thereof, and articles dealing with replication methods and the development of standards for replications. IREE is an e-journal and articles are published continuously after passing a fast peer-review process. Along with the article, authors must submit the underlying data and programming. The several parts of the publications (article, data, and programming) are each provided with a DOI to be citable in due form and restored in a data archive. IREE is an open access journal and all content is without any charge to the users and authors. We aim to support transparent and open research based on micro-economic data and thereby to improve research quality in empirical economics.