new publication (2019-1)

Tweet Sixteen and Pregnant: Missing Links in the Causal Chain from Reality TV to Fertility. A replication study of Kearney & Levine (American Economic Review, 2015).

by David A. Jaeger, Theodore J. Joyce & Robert Kaestner

Abstract
We replicate and extend the analysis of the positive association between social media (Google searches and tweets) and the MTV program 16 and Pregnant recently published by Melissa Kearney and Phillip Levine (2015). We find that the relationship disappears or even turns negative when we include in the analysis periods when new episodes of 16 and Pregnant were not being broadcast. The results are also sensitive to the use of weights. Our results cast substantial doubt on social media as a link in the causal chain between reality television and fertility.

» Read this replication study here.
» See a list of all publications in IREE here.

recently published (2018-5)

Federal minimum wage hikes do reduce teenage employment. A replication study of Bazen & Marimoutou (Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 2002).

by Stephen Bazen & Velayoudom Marimoutou

Abstract
In 2002 we published a paper in which we used state space time series methods to analyse the teenage employment-federal minimum wage relationship in the US (Bazen and Marimoutou, 2002). The study used quarterly data for the 46 year period running from 1954 to 1999. We detected a small, negative but statistically significant effect of the federal minimum wage on teenage employment, at a time when some studies were casting doubt on the existence of such an effect. In this note we re-estimate the original model with a further 16 years of data (up to 2015). We find that the model satisfactorily tracks the path of the teenage employment-population ratio over this 60 year period, and yields a consistently negative and statistically significant effect of minimum wages on teenage employment. The conclusion reached is the same as in the original paper, and the elasticity estimates very similar: federal minimum wage hikes lead to a reduction in teenage employment with a short run elasticity of around -0.13. The estimated long run elasticity of between -0.37 and -0.47 is less stable, but is nevertheless negative and statistically significant.

» Read this replication study here.
» See a list of all publications in IREE here.

newest publication in IREE (2018-4)

Malaria Eradication in the Americas. A replication study of Bleakley (American Economic Journal. Applied Economics, 2010).

by David Roodman

Abstract
Bleakley (2010) finds that large-scale campaigns in the \nth{20} century to eradicate malaria were followed by income gains for those native to historically endemic areas. I perform a pre-registered reanalysis and find these results to be largely robust. Malaria eradication efforts indeed appear to have been followed by anomalous income gains for natives of historically malarial areas of Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and perhaps the United States. This supportive finding diverges from that of a separate, parallel reanalysis of Bleakley (2007), a study that finds long-term benefits from a hookworm eradication campaign in the United States.

» Read this replication study here.
» See a list of all publications in IREE here.

newly published in IREE (2018-3)

The Impacts of Hookworm Eradication in the American South. A replication study of Bleakley (The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2007).

by David Roodman

Abstract
Through designs akin to difference-in-differences, Bleakley (2007) produces evidence that the campaign to eradicate hookworm from the American South circa 1910 boosted school enrollment in childhood and income in adulthood. This comment works to replicate and reanalyze that study. Innovations include incorporation of the larger U.S. Census samples now available, and fitting of specifications focusing more sharply on the timing of any effects of the campaign, which are the basis of the most credible identification. The long-term convergence between historically low- and high-hookworm areas documented in Bleakley (2007) began decades before the campaign and did not accelerate in a way that would invite hookworm eradication as an explanation. Likewise, in the case of adult income, the convergence continued for decades after. In sum, hookworm eradication did not leave a telltale imprint on the historical record assembled here.

» Read this replication study here.
» See a list of all publications in IREE here.

Welcome to IREE: the journal for replications in empirical economics.

 

The International Journal for Re-Views in Empirical Economics (IREE) is the first journal for the publication of replication studies based on micro economic data. Furthermore, IREE publishes systematic reviews, micro data sets and descriptions thereof, and articles dealing with replication methods and the development of standards for replications. IREE is an e-journal and articles are published continuously after passing a fast peer-review process. Along with the article, authors must submit the underlying data and programming. The several parts of the publications (article, data, and programming) are each provided with a DOI to be citable in due form and restored in a data archive. IREE is an open access journal and all content is without any charge to the users and authors. We aim to support transparent and open research based on micro-economic data and thereby to improve research quality in empirical economics.